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I had wanted to write about President Bush’s chutzpah in invoking the subject of Vietnam in a speech last week before the VFW. While a lot was both said and written on the subject, nothing so far had quite the reaction I’ve been looking for. A line from a favorite pinball game keeps ringing in my ears:


(Click to play)

Allawi But something even more important has come up. We all had to see this coming.

Reports have been flying fast & furious lately… despite half-hearted denials… that the Bush White House would like to see the current Iraqi Prime Minister, Nouri Al-Maliki, replaced with a “more effective” leader that will help them out of Iraq. And that dream leader to replace him is Iyad Allawi, the former interim PM of Iraq before the first Iraqi elections in 2005.

What makes Iyad Allawi such an attractive replacement for Maliki? Allawi, a former Ba’athist (the Arab Socialist Party – you know, the guys Paul Bremer and Donald Rumsfeld were so hot to “de-Bathify” from the Iraqi government?), and one of the founding members of the Socialist “Iraqi National Accord” while in exile (now an active political party in the Iraqi Parliament) came to prominence as MI6’s (the British CIA) lead source on Iraq’s Weapons of Mass Destruction, feeding them fabricated intel in order to trick other countries into taking out Saddam, doing the dirty work for him. Essentially, Allawi was to MI6 what Ahmed Chalabi was to the CIA (the former Bush darling, whom all evidence suggests Bush intended to install as President of Iraq after the invasion so we could get out quick, just as they did with Karzai in Afghanistan. But when no WMD’s were found like he promised, the Bush Administration realized too late they had been duped, sticking them in Iraq without a Plan-B).

Maybe it should come as no surprise that Allawi and Chalabi are so much alike. They were boyhood friends after all. In 1992, the CIA under the George H.W. Bush Administration, recruited Allawi to provide intel on Saddam Hussein, whom they had just kicked out of Kuwait.

It was Allawi who was responsible for Tony Blair’s September, 2002 pronouncement that Saddam Hussein possessed missiles “capable of striking London in under 45 minutes“… a complete and total fabrication with the clear intent to ratchet-up the fear of Saddam Hussein and spur on an invasion of Iraq.

In early 2004 while still the interim unelected Prime Minster of Iraq, Iyad Allawi visited an Iraq police station where some Iraqi men had been arrested as suspected insurgents. Still handcuffed and blindfolded, Allawi lined six of them up against the courtyard wall and shot them in the head with his own gun. Though Allawi’s office denied the report in its entirety, a dozen Iraqi policemen and four Americans from his personal security team say they watched the event in stunned silence.

Allawi is now actively campaigning for the job as Maliki’s successor, even paying an American political PR firm… run by a bunch of Bush-loving former Republican Congressmen… $300,000 to advise his campaign.

An “update” to the “National Intelligence Estimate” released last week predicted that the violence in Iraq was expected to “remain high” for the next “six to 12 months”, increasing concerns that Iraqi PM Maliki is incapable of bringing his country under control so that we can leave Iraq before Bush leaves Washington.

I’ve often argued… as have others… that Saddam Hussein’s brutality is likely the only thing that held Iraq together for all those years. The civil war we see happening now in Iraq is the result of his removal. A violent “power-struggle” between different factions all fighting for control of Iraq. And now, the Bush Administration is looking for another “U.S. friendly” brutal dictator like Saddam to take control of Iraq so they can finally get out.

Apparently, all that rhetoric about “freeing the Iraqi people from the oppression of a brutal dictator” was just that: rhetoric.

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